Juliet Floyd

 

Juliet Floyd,BA Wellesley College 1982, Ph.D. Harvard University 1990,is Professor of Philosophy and a member of the Center for Philosophy of Science at Boston University, coming to Boston University from CCNY and the City University of New York, where she served as Associate Director of the Ph.D. program at the Graduate Center. A philosopher of logic, mathematics and scientific method and an historian of the interplay between logic and philosophy from the 18th and the 20th centuries, she helped found the historical study of analytic philosophy in an international context, holding Visiting Professorships at the Universities of Vienna, Paris (I, Panthéon-Sorbonne), and Bordeaux (Michel de Montaigne).

She co-edited Future Pasts: The Analytic Tradition in Twentieth Century Philosophy (with S. Shieh, Oxford University Press, 2001), Philosophical Explorations of the Legacy of Alan Turing: Turing 100 (with A. Bokulich, Springer Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science Series, forthcoming), and Philosophy of Emerging Media: Understanding, Appreciation, Application (with J.E. Katz, Oxford University Press 2016), authoring over fifty articles, book chapters and reviews on Kant, Dedekind, Russell, Wittgenstein, Gödel, Turing, Quine, Rawls, Putnam and Cavell.

Her research themes span the nature and limitations of philosophical and axiomatic methods, simplicity and modernism in mathematics and the arts, skepticism and rule-following, the concepts of “rigor” and the “everyday” in early twentieth-century philosophy, logic and foundations of mathematics, as well as the history of American philosophy and pragmatism in relation to European and Asian twentieth century analytic philosophy.

She sits on several editorial boards (Philosophia Mathematica, The Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy, The Journal of the History of Philosophy, Palgrave Series in the History of Analytic Philosophy, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Associate Senior Editor, Twentieth Century) and is a member of the American Philosophical Association’s Committee on International Cooperation. A recipient of several major fellowship awards to pursue research in the U.K., Germany, France and Austria, she has served on the European Research Council and the external scientific review board of the Faculty of Philosophy in Vienna.

Her experience drafting the first Strategic Plan for Boston University (2006-8) gives her a breadth of perspective on BU’s institutional and pedagogical aspirations. Her archival and editorial contributions to the history of twentieth-century philosophy (Frege, Wittgenstein, Sheffer, Gödel, S.K. Langer, Quine, Rawls) give her first-hand experience of the challenges facing the digital ethics of open-source, editorial and primary research material in the humanities.